3 Facts About Labor Day You Didn’t Know

    THE FIRST LABOR DAY WAS CELEBRATED SEPTEMBER 5TH, 1882 IN NEW YORK CITY

    In Manhattan on Tuesday September 5th, 1882 over 10,000 citizens marched for labor rights. At the time, most workers averaged a 12 hour work day, six days a week. The eight-hour work day was established on September 3rd, 1916 when the Adamson Act was passed.

    WHY WE CAN WEAR WHITE AFTER LABOR DAY

    Apparently, there are several theories why this archaic societal rule was established

    The most obvious theory is that Memorial Day begins the summer season and Labor Day ends the summer season, which means lighter clothes are no longer necessary after Labor Day.

    Another theory is that white clothing was a luxury of the upper class. After the Civil War white clothing became more accessible to the lower class, which made it difficult to distinguish who was old money and who was new money. According to the theory, the ladies from older money made a fashion rule of No White After Labor Day to identify who was new money.

    The last theory is that a popular fashion magazine wanted to promote fall clothing after Labor Day, which didn’t include white clothing.

    LABOR DAY MARKS THE END OF TWO SEASONS AND THE BEGINNING OF ONE

    Labor Day marks the end of SUMMER and the end of HOT DOG SEASON. Yep, that’s right. Hot dog season, according to the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council website. It’s also the beginning of NFL season!

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